The sound’s of modern music

For those of you who have lived in the world of digital music it might be difficult for you to imagine exactly how your ancestors survived each day without the sounds of music being pumped into the airwaves. Music and music lessons have actually been around since the dawn of man, however it was often used as a celebratory form of art expression rather than a daily occurrence.

Horns and drums were used to earmark the beginning of a siege or war and was not necessarily received with a welcome tone by the villagers.

Ancient forms of music were mainly used during religious sacrifices, bloody battles and burial ceremonies that it had a somewhat negative and eerie tone to it. Thankfully, we have a more upbeat appreciation for music than our ancestors did.

Long before the modern IPod and MP3 players were developed there were a variety of portable music devices such as the Walkman and Discman that any adult over forty can probably attest to owning. They offered a freedom never before heard of and while they were way ahead of their time, nothing matches the unmistakable clarity and sound than modern day portable devices developed and marketed by Apple Inc offer.

Digitally mastered sound has its own merits, however there is nothing more beautiful or artistic than the sound of a live orchestra ringing through the halls of a soundproof amphitheatre.

The beauty of an orchestra lies in the musicians ability to create perfect notes and sounds that harmonize with one another. If one note fails, the entire arrangement can go sour quite quickly. Imagine the pressure a musician must feel to make certain that each note he or creates is nothing less than perfect?

Perhaps it is this quest for perfection that makes an orchestra so intriguing and so exciting.

The first known occurrence of a symphony took place in the early 1600’s, in Giovanni Gabrieli‘s “Sarae Symphonia Opera,” but as you can imagine, it was not nearly as sophisticated as one of today’s full scale symphonies.

The Internet has provided us with a medium in which to collaborate on musical pieces from a variety of different places, genres and time periods all at the same time. We can craft musical arrangements like never before.

Interestingly enough, even though the instruments and arrangements used to create the sounds change frequently, the basic notes and chords have and always will remain the same. This is the mathematical side of music and the one thing that is forever constant in the world of music.

The Internet, along with wireless communication has drastically changed the face of music.

For the first time in the history of music not only can humans participate in creating large scale orchestrated sounds, the introduction of the wireless sounds of birds, whales, frogs and other animals into the mix has allowed all earth’s creatures to harmonize.

Can you even begin to imagine what an orchestra may look and sound like in the distant future or where music will go from here?